FAQ

Q: My watch has stopped running

If you have a Quartz timepiece, the battery may need to be changed. Batteries typically have a life expectancy of 3 years.

If you have a mechanical timepiece, you may need to wind the crown manually 40-50 times. Automatic watches have a self-winding device in the form of a weight, which oscillates the movement of the wearer’s wrist to create a power reserve. Upon receiving a new watch, the crown must be wound 40-50 times to start the watch running.

If not worn daily, the power reserve may be drained requiring the watch to be wound manually. It is common for a watch to lose about 4-5 seconds per day. If you experience slow movement in your mechanical timepiece, it may either not have established enough power reserve or is due for maintenance.

A common misconception is that by simply shaking an automatic watch, it will give sufficient motion to enable the watch to maintain accurate time. This is false because this procedure will neither wind the main spring sufficiently nor establish a power reserve, ultimately causing the watch to stop or track time inaccurately. If you do not like to wind your crown every so often, it is recommended to buy a watch winder to keep consistency.

If your watch is fully wound and still does not run, it may be time to bring your watch in for a complete maintenance service. Most manufacturers recommend a maintenance service every 4 to 5 years.


Q: The crown is tight.

Be cautious not to force the crown if it is tight.If you feel resistance on the crown, stop winding. Winding a tight crown can damage the mechanism. Some watch models feature a screw down crown to ensure water does not travel inside the case. If your watch does not feature a screw-down crown please bring in your watch for further inspection.


Q: My watch is running slow.

Many mechanical watches are automatic or self-winding. Automatic watches have a self-winding devise in the form of a weight, which oscillates the movement of the wearer’s wrist to create a power reserve. Upon receiving a new watch, the crown must be wound 40-50 times to start the watch running.

If not worn daily, the power reserve may be drained requiring the watch to be wound manually. It is common for a watch to lose about 4-5 seconds per day. If you experience slow movement in your mechanical timepiece, it may either not have established enough power reserve or is due for maintenance.

A common misconception is that by simply shaking an automatic watch, it will give sufficient motion to enable the watch to maintain accurate time. This is false because this procedure will neither wind the main spring sufficiently nor establish a power reserve, ultimately causing the watch to stop or track time inaccurately. If you do not like to wind your crown every so often, it is recommended to buy a watch winder to keep consistency.

If your watch is fully wound and still running slow, it may be time to bring your watch in for a complete maintenance service. Most manufacturers recommend a maintenance service every 4 to 5 years.


Q: My watch is running fast.

If your watch is running fast, it may be a subject of magnetism or is due for maintenance.

Some watch components inside the case are highly susceptible to magnetic fields. Avoid placing your watch near speakers or refrigerators. In order to combat magnetism, you need to have your watch demagnetized at a service center or buy a watch that has anti-magnetic properties in it such as silicium.

If your watch is still running fast after being demagnetized, it may be time to bring your watch in for a complete maintenance service. The hairspring of the watch may be out of place (caused by shocks, dropping the watch, etc) or stuck together by the internal lubricants of a watch movement. Most manufacturers recommend a maintenance service every 4 to 5 years.


Q: How do I care for my watch?

Simple Cleaning: Use a soft brush with soapy water to removes impurities, dust and fingerprints on metal components. Use a soft cloth to dry.

Ultrasonic Cleaning: Deep cleaning will remove any dirt from the watch. Not offered in store. May be sent out to the original manufacturer.

Refurbishing: Restores the original condition of your watch and eliminates any man-made scratches. May includes polishing or cleaning of the item, and rhodium plating if made of white gold. Not offered in store. May be sent out to the original manufacturer.

Water Resistance: Be aware of your watch and its capable limits. Always rinse your watch with warm water after bathing in the sea. Do not wear your watch in the shower or to the sauna. Screw in your crown to ensure that no water will enter the mechanism.

Avoid:
Thermal shocks, extreme temperatures
Physical shocks
Chemical products (direct contact with perfumes, solvents, detergents, comestic products)


Q: How do I care for my jewelry?

Simple Cleaning: Use a soft brush with soapy water to removes impurities, dust and fingerprints from the surface of your jewel. Use a soft cloth to dry.

Jewelry Cleaner: Easy to use jewelry cleaner can be purchased in store. Not applicable for pearls, coral, coins and emeralds.

Ultrasonic Cleaning: Deep cleaning will remove any dirt from the jewel. Not applicable for pearls, coral, coins and emeralds. Not offered in store. May be sent out to the original manufacturer.

Refurbishing: Restores the original condition of your jewel and eliminates any man-made scratches. May includes polishing or cleaning of the item, and rhodium plating if made of white gold. Not offered in store. May be sent out to the original manufacturer.

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